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European students with national minority background invited to Danish Folk High School in the Danish-German border region

 

European students with a national minority background are invited to visit the Danish-German border region and stay at a Danish Folk High School, Jaruplund Højskole, for 13 weeks, 29th March to 28th June 2020 – the year of the 100th anniversary of the Danish-German border.


Source: Grænseforeningen


 Jaruplund Højskole is a Danish Folk High School situated south the Danish-German border and close to Flensburg. European students are invited to take part in a Folk High School course at Jaruplund Højskole in 13 weeks in 2020. / Photo: Grænseforeningenof

The project Minority Changemaker Programme is an initiative of the Danish border Association, Grænseforeningen, which also sponsors the project with 270.000 Euro. Jaruplund Højskole situated in a green area in the outskirts of Flensburg, Germany, offers education and accommodation to the European students that will be part of this special Nordic concept for adult education that generally does not grant academic degrees. However, through this project the students may obtain 15 ECTS-points for further studies. Project partners are also the University of Southern Denmark and Youth of European Nationalities (YEN).

 

Knud-Erik Therkelsen, the general secretary of Grænseforeningen, says:

 

“The national minorities in Europe are struggling to preserve their identity and for minority rights in the EU. We strive for the national minorities to gain higher priority on the European agenda and sincerely believe that the European youth must be engaged to achieve this goal.”
“2020 is a special year in the Danish-German border region and the right time to invite young Europeans to this special place in northern Europe. The Danish-German minority model and the history of this region, which has moved from conflict to living peacefully together, will be part of the curriculum.”

 

 Wienke Reimer, born 1991 in Schleswig as a part of the Danish national minority in Germany,
cand.scient.anth. (International studies and anthropology), Aarhus University, 2018, master’s thesis about the North Frisian minority in Germany, studied at Danang University, Vietnam, research project about nationalism and racism in South Africa. Lives in Berlin. Earlier employed at the Minority Secretariat in Berlin. Has earlier worked as a volunteer in Grænseforeningen’s Ambassadors project. / Photo: Grænseforeningenof

Wienke Reimer, project manager of Minority Changemaker Programme, says:

 

“Through YEN, I am already in contact with many European students who are excited about this project. Being a part of a national minority as I am, you know how important it is to get together with others who are occupied with minority issues and the future of Europe. Minority Changemaker Programme makes this happen in 2020, and I am looking so much forward.”
In order to prepare the students for their stay at the Danish Folk High School in 2020, a series of workshops, Minority Labs, will be arranged in five cities in Europe throughout 2019. Also, extracurricular activities such as Roskilde Festival and The People’s Meeting on Bornholm are included.

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Minority media are cultural heritage, as concluded at the Second European Conference on Minority and Local Media in Novi Sad

 

The Second European Conference on Minority and Local Media, which took place on 15 November at Kolegijum Evropa in Novi Sad, drew the conclusion that minority media are cultural heritage.


 

This year’s installment of the conference, which has been discussing and analysing the environment and developments in the minority and local media arena — as well as the media in general — for seven years now and which last year turned into a European platform, invited the public to consider the introductory question “Are minority media cultural heritage?” and tried to give a specific answer to the question through different perspectives over the two conference days.

 

The answer was indeed affirmative, asserting that these media must not remain “walled off” because their presence is not an end in itself, but rather, as a medium that is part of the public information system, they have the purpose of providing timely, objective, and impartial information.

 

 

On the first conference day, a talk on “Minority Rights and Media in South Tyrol” was given via video by Marc Röggla, Researcher, European Academy, Institute for Minority Rights, Italy, and Secretary General of MIDAS.The second day of the conference saw four panels initiate a constructive dialogue on the role and potential directions of development of the media in the focus of this event, with notable participation from the students of the Mihajlo Pupin School of Electrical Engineering in Novi Sad, Serbia, who are taking the Media Literacy elective course.

 

 

The first panel — Multiculturalism and Cultural Heritage — applied different perspectives to address the issue of multiculturalism as a way of life and communication, in the context of the European Year of Cultural Heritage, which was launched by the European Union. The panellists used personal experiences and attitudes to portray concrete ways in which multiculturalism and interculturalism can be lived both in private lives and in public spaces.

 

 

Minority media should establish specific self-regulatory mechanisms precisely in the context of the recent elections for national councils of national minorities, as voiced at the second panel on “Self-Regulation of Minority and Local Media and Entrepreneurial Journalism”. The panelists agreed that all media, without exception, must have and develop journalistic codes of ethics and professional standards in their agendas. At the same time, everyone agreed that both minority and local media must keep up with trends in journalism, media, and digitization and accordingly develop new business models, products, and services in order to maintain financial stability and sustainability.

 

 

The third European Minority Media Production panel, moderated by Nataša Heror, Managing Director of Heror Media Pont, the guests from Europe presented their media outlets: Gwyn Nissen, Editor-in-Chief, Der Nordschleswiger, Denmark, Marc Marcè, Editor-in-Chief at Regió7, Catalonia, Spain, Janek Schäfer, Editor-in-Chief at Serbske Nowiny, Germany, and Rajmund Klonowski, Editor-in-Chief at Kurier Wilenski, Lithuania.

 

The participants of the fourth panel discussed minority media as bridges of cooperation between countries where minority communities live and their countries of origin. However, the biggest focus in the discussion was on the development of the new public information strategy for the Republic of Serbia, the draft of which is set to be published by the end of this year.
Conference organizers were Heror Media Pont, Magyar Szó, Media Association, Centre for Minority Rights Development, and MIDAS.


Photo: Dragan Kurucić

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Agenda of Second European Conference devoted to Minority and Local Media

 

Second European Conference devoted to Minority and Local Media that will be held from 15th  until 17th November in Novi Sad (Kolegijum Evropa, Ćirila i Metodija street 11) will searching for answers to the question Are minority media a cultural heritage? in a two conference days.

 

AGENDA

15th Novembar 2018

Kolegijum Evropa, Novi Sad

 

12:00-12:30 registration

 

12:30-13:15 Lecture: “How to Reach the Space of Freedom in Media?”, Goran Tomka, Teaching assistant at the Faculty of Sport and Tourism in Novi Sad and UNESCO Chair in cultural policy and management, University of Arts, Belgrade

 

13:30-14:15 Lecture: “New Business Models and Sustainability of Media”, Pavle Zlatić, Digital Media Lead at IREX

 

14:30-15:00 Lecture: “Minority Rights and Media in South Tyrol”, Marc Emanuel Röggla, researcher, European Academy, Institut for minority rights

 

15:00- 16:00 lunch & networking

 

18:00-19:00 Opening reception of the II European conference devoted to minority & local media

 

16th Novembar 2018

Kolegijum Evropa, Novi Sad

 

08:30-9:00 registration of participants

 

09:00-09:15 Opening of the second day of conference

 

9:15-10:45 I PANEL: MULTICULTURE AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

Moderator: Robert Čoban, CEO Color Media Communications

 

Goran Tomka, Teaching assistant at the Faculty of Sport and Tourism in Novi Sad and UNESCO Chair in cultural policy and management, University of Arts, Belgrade

 

Nemanja Milenković, General Manager Fondation Novi Sad ECoC 2021 (tbc)

 

Miodrag Bogić, film and TV director, MAGMA film, Beograd

 

 

11:00-12:30 II PANEL: SELFREGULATION OF MINORITY & LOCAL MEDIA AND ENTERPRENEURIAL JOURNALISM

Moderator: Vladimira Dorčova Valtnerova, Editor-In-Chief www.storyteller.rs

 

Davor Marko, Media System Lead, IREX

 

Gordana Novaković, Secretary General of the Press Council

 

Violeta Jovanov Peštanac, Editor-In-Chief www.pancevomojkraj.rs

 

Gwyn Nissen, self-regulation of minority media in Europe, Der Nordschleswiger, Denmark

 

12:30-13:00 coffe break & networking

 

13:00-14:30 III PANEL: EUROPEAN PRODUCTION OF MINORITY MEDIA

Moderator: Nataša Heror, CEO Heror Media Pont

 

Gwyn Nissen, Editor-In-Chief, Der Nordschleswiger, Denmark

 

Marc Marcè, Editor-In-Chief, Regió7, Catalonia, Spain

 

Janek Schäfer, Editor-In-Chief, Serbske Nowiny,

 

Germany Rajmund Klonowski, Editor-In-Chief,

 

Kurier Wilenski, Lithvania

 

14:30 – 15:30 lunch break

 

15:30-17:00 IV PANEL: DO MINORITY MEDIA HOUSES HAVE AN INFLUENCE IN THE PROCESS OF EU INTEGRATION AND HOW?

Moderator: Valentin Mik, Editor-Coordinator of Romanian weekly “Libertatea”

 

Andor Deli, representative in European Parliament

 

Đorđe Vukmirović, Assistant for media of the Provincial Secretary for Culture, Public Integration and Relations with Religious Communities

 

Aleksandar Simurdić, Secretary General European Movement in Serbia, office in Novi Sad

 

17:30-18:30 visiting the news room of Slovakian weekly “Hlas l’udu”

 

17th Novembar 2018

 

9:00-13:00 Sightseeing of historical center of Novi Sad and Petrovaradin Fortress for guests from MIDAS and/or appointed meetings

 

14:00 guests departure

Organizers: Heror Media Pont, Magyar Szó, Media Association in Serbia, Minority & Local Media Development Center in cooperation with MIDAS

 

Patrons: Ministry for culture and information, Secretariat for culture, public relations and relationship to the religious communities of Vojvodina, Secretariat for education, administration, regulation and minority communities of Vojvodina, City Council of Novi Sad in charge for culture and Foundation ECC Novi Sad 2021.

 

FEE INFORMATION

 

Fee euro
Two days 150,00

 

EARLY BIRDS – until 1th November 20% discount

 

APPLICATION
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Official announcement of Second European Conference devoted to Minority and Local Media in Novi Sad

 

“Magyar Szó”, Association of Media in Serbia, Heror Media Pont and Minority and Local Media Development in cooperation with MIDAS will be held on 15th to 17th November 2018, as announced on today`s press conference in Novi Sad`s City Hall.


 

Dalibor Rozić, a member of the City Council for Culture said that Novi Sad as an extremely multinational environment, which traditionally supports the preservation of cultural diversity, recognizes the importance of minority media both in this process and in general. “A conference that questioning their social role and thus promotes them further, is very important to us, and I am very pleased that the conference has found its place in the project “Novi Sad 2021”. The City Administration has a special calls for media proposals and we are supporting all projects of general interest, because we are aware of the specific nature of non-commercial content and the important role that media play in the society,” said Rozic.

 

Provincial Secretary for Culture, Public Information and Relations with Religious Communities Dragana Milošević emphasized the importance of this Conference because it deals in a pragmatic way on the issues of media in the national minorities languages. She pointed out that the provincial government in the last two years increased the funds allocated for the financing of the media in minority languages, adding that the intention of the Provincial government is to increase funds in the next year and support of minority media in the territory of Vojvodina.

 

Nataša Heror, CEO of Heror Media Pont, emphasized that the Second European Conference, entitled “Are minority media a cultural heritage?”, will be tackling the position of minority media as active factors in the development of European societies.

 

“The search for answers to this question will take place through several main themes: cultural rights, self-regulation of minority media and defining the phenomenon of minority media as a cultural heritage. The European character of this conference provides insight into the production and degree of influence of minority media throughout Europe on societies in which they create their content. The event is integrated into the “PLUS Interculturality Days”, project of Novi Sad 2021 European Capital of Culture, and one of the goals for this year is to promote Novi Sad and Vojvodina as a cultural destination using the potentials of their original multicultural environment, through active cooperation with minority media in both Serbia and Europe,” said Natasa Heror.

 

The first day of the conference is reserved for lectures on the main themes for journalists, students, media management, representatives of institutions and organizations dealing with the status of minority communities, minority and cultural rights, as well as high school students attending the optional subject “Media and Media Literacy”, while the event will take place on the second day through plenary work in four panels.

 

Applications for the Conference can be submitted through site Media Pont.

Source: City of Novi Sad
Photo: Dávid Csilla

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“Are the Minority Media cultural heritage?” as main topic at Second European Conference devoted to Minority and Local Media

 

The 2th European conference devoted to Minority and Local Media with a main theme “Are the Minority Media cultural heritage?” will be held on 15th -17th November 2018 in Novi Sad. The Conference will be questioning the position of Minority Media and its  role of active  mediators in the development of European societies.


The Conference will look for answers to this question through few major themes: cultural rights, self-regulation of Minority Media and the definition of the phenomenon of Minority Media as a cultural heritage. The European character of Conference gives a possibility for insights in production and levels of influence Minority Media in European societies in which they create content.

 

Considering that the event is integrated into the PLUS Interculturality days of the project Novi Sad EPK 2021, we will focus on one of the operational goals foreseen for 2018, namely “Promoting Novi Sad and Vojvodina as a cultural destination using the potentials of their original multicultural environment” through the support of the active cooperation with minority media both in Serbia and throughout Europe.

 

First European Conference devoted to Minority and Local media 2017

 

The first day of the event is reserved for lectures on the main topics of events for journalists, students and media managers, representatives of institutions and organizations dealing with the status of minority communities, minority and cultural rights. Lectures by visiting professors and professionals from the media sphere on the above topics are also planned. The second day of the event will take place through plenary work in four panels. The third day is foreseen for sightseeing activities of the city of Novi Sad for guests from abroad and / or arranged meetings.

 

EVENT AGENDA
15th November 2018 Collegium Europe, Novi Sad

12: 00-12: 30 Registration of the participants

12: 30-13: 15 Lecture: Cultural Rights

13:30-14:15 Lecture: New business models and media sustainability

14:30-15:00 Lecture: Minority rights and media in South Tirol

15:00- 16:00 Lunch and networking

18:00-19:00 Opening of the 2nd European Conference devoted to minority and local media

 

16th November 2018 Collegium Europe, Novi Sad

8: 30-9: 00 Registration of the participants

9: 00-09: 15 Opening of the second day of the conference

9: 15-10: 45 I PANEL: MULTICULTURALITY AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

Moderator: Robert Čoban, CEO Color media Communications

11: 00-12: 30 II PANEL: SELF-REGULATION OF MINORITY AND LOCAL MEDIA AND ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNALISM

Moderator: Vladimira Dorčova Valtnerova, Editor-in-chief of “Storyteller”

12:30-13:00 Coffee break and networking

13: 00-14: 30 III PANEL: EUROPEAN PRODUCTION OF MINORITY MEDIA

Moderator: Nataša Heror, CEO Heror Media Pont

14:30 – 15:30 Lunch break

15:30-17:00 IV PANEL: CAN MINORITY MEDIA INFLUENCE THE EUROPEAN INTEGRATION PROCESS?

Moderator: Valentin Mik, Deputy editor-in-chief of the weekly in the Romanian language “Liberatea”

 

17th November 2018

9:00-13:00 Organized tour of the narrow center of the city of Novi Sad and Petrovaradin Fortress for guests from abroad and / or holding scheduled meetings

 

Special guests: Gwyn Nissen, Marc Marcé, Raiss István, Lórant Vincze

 

Organizators of The Second European Conference devoted to Minority and Local Media are Heror Media Pont, Magyar Szó, Media Association of Serbia, Minority and Local Media Development Centre in cooperation with MIDAS.

 

FEE INFORMATION

Registration for Conference is available through REGISTRATION FORM.

Fee euro
Two days 150,00

 

EARLY BIRDS – until 1th November 20% discount

 

More information about fees:  Nataša Heror, natasa@herormediapont.com, +381607337555

Contact: Vladimira Dorčova Valtnerova, vladimira.dorcova.valtner@gmail.com, +381643333272

 

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Minority SafePack in the EU: Better security and legislative package for national minorities and ethnic groups

A little over a month ago at the European Union level, the European citizens’ initiative Minority SafePack, which is one of the most important political initiatives in the last 20 years in the field of ethno-cultural minorities, is successfully completed, informs the newly established portal Storyteller. This initiative was initiated by FUEN, the umbrella organization of autochthonous national minorities and ethnic groups in Europe, which has about 90 member organizations in 33 European countries.

Storyteller presents an interview with Loránt Vincze, president of FUEN and the main initiator of the campaign, about the initiative of Minority SafePack and the current situation and challenges faced by national minorities in the quest for the protection of their ethno-cultural identity.

 

What does represent Minority SafePack, what are its most important mission and role?

 

L. V. : “The motto of the European Union is “In varietate concordia – United in diversity”. The purpose of the Minority SafePack Initiative is to encourage the European Union to live up to its motto and to improve the protection of people belonging to national and linguistic minorities and strengthen cultural and linguistic diversity in the Union. The European Union has ignored these requests too often in the past, and has left the minority issues to be dealt with on a Member State level, or by other international organisations. The EU has programs and actions for the dominant cultures and the official languages, while there are more than 50 million EU citizens belonging to historical minorities, and many of them speak lesser used or endangered languages. It is our duty as Europeans to protect at all costs this valuable cultural and linguistic heritage. The Minority SafePack Initiative is a package of law proposals for the safety of the national minorities, a set of EU legal acts that enable the promotion of minority rights, language rights, and the protection of their cultures. In short, it sums up our main objectives: safety for minorities and legislative package for minorities. We want: an EU Recommendation for the protection and promotion of cultural and linguistic diversity, funding programmes for small linguistic communities, the creation of a Language Diversity Centre, the objectives of EU’s regional development funds to include the protection of national minorities and the promotion of cultural and linguistic diversity, research about the added value of minorities to our societies and Europe, approximating equality for stateless minorities e.g. Roma, a single European copyright law, so that services and broadcast can be enjoyed in the mother tongue, freedom of service and reception of audio-visual content in the minority regions and block exemption of regional (state) support for minority culture, media and cultural heritage conservation.”

Loránt Vincze, president of FUEN (Photo: www.fuen.org)

 

I guess it was a huge challenge to get more than one million signatures / what kind of campaign was it, how it was structured and organized?

 

L. V. : “Our campaign was not a simple issue-based campaign, as the Initiative itself is quite complex. It is also not a universal problem we were talking about, because the situation of minority groups differs from member state to member state. It was also not easy to reach out to our primal target population, which of course are the ones belonging to minorities. We had to communicate in many languages, some of them lesser used ones, and I think we had messages in almost 50 different languages targeted to different audiences. The messages also had to be different as we tried to explain to each community what are the parts of our initiative that befit them the most, what are the issues that motivate them. We had a central campaign team and local coordinators, more than 20 people worked in this structure. What we have built is a network of many organisations, institutions, groups, persons and communities with a similar mind-set and agenda. This is a network we can and have to build on in the future, not only for the MSPI, but for every issue concerning the rights of autochthonous minorities, nationalities, language groups. The MSPI has shown us that together we are stronger. It also sent a clear message to all the minorities of Europe: you are not alone. Overall, we consider the Minority SafePack campaign to be a big success and a huge win for all the autochthonous minorities, language groups and nationalities without a kin-state of Europe. This is the first time ever that these groups act together as one, and we consider this to be a historic moment. In my point of view the greatest achievement of the campaign is not that we managed to collect more than one million signatures, but the fact that we gave birth to a European movement for minority rights. We largely exceeded our own plans by having more than 1,200,000 signatures and 11 states that reached the national threshold. Of course we had many bumps, we had to realise that some of our original plans were not working, not all of the organisations we were counting on at the beginning were up to the task. But we also got the support of some very strong communities like the Basques and Catalans or the Polish from Lithuania, the Turkish community of Bulgaria and so on.”

 

Campaign was successful but work isn`t done yet, what are next steps?

 

L. V. : “First we will present the statements of support to the competent national authorities, and then to the European Commission. The Commission has to organise a public hearing in the European Parliament and has to make his position known before 3 October. We believe that Europe has to hear our voices, and the European Commission has to take our demands seriously. We have strong support from some member states and many regions, and we will continue lobbying for our cause. We are aware that this is probably going to be a long and hard-fought process, but we are ready for it. We will have concrete legislative proposals to be taken into account. All this years the European Commission simply rejected any questions or proposals on minority rights saying it is not in its competences. EU citizens in large numbers say today this attitude has to change. The European values, the linguistic and cultural diversity are a concern for the whole EU.

 

What is a “position” or “situation” of national minorities in EU and Europe nowadays?

 

L. V. : “The minorities of Europe face different problems and challenges. Most of the minorities of Western and Northern Europe are in a good situation where the state considers them equal citizens and offers them equal rights with the majority or in other cases in this space the legal framework on minority rights is frozen. Meanwhile many states in Eastern Europe fail to offer even the most basic rights for them. Greece or Bulgaria does not even recognize some of its minorities (strangely enough this also applies for France), and then there are the stateless people who are not even given citizenship in the countries where they live. The rights provided differs much from one country to the other, even respecting the existing legislation is a challenge in many countries. Let us face it, in the region there are many newly created states with young and fragile democracies. Introducing new norms and change the mentality of the majority takes time and many investments from both sides. So, it would be hard to say that all the minorities of Europe are confronted with the same problems. But this doesn`t mean that we have no common goals: we all want to be equal, we all want protection for our language and culture, we all want guarantees that nobody can take away our rights. We want to feel at home in our countries. Unfortunately, history and everyday experiences have both shown us that not all European states are up for this task. This is why we at FUEN think that the European Union should share competencies with the Member States regarding minority issues.”

 

Why is important to preserve and develop minority rights?

 

L. V. :  “As I said before, cultural and linguistic diversity is valuable and needs to be protected. Also, minority politics are peace politics. The states which have realised that creating the right minority protection framework and treating their citizens who belong to the minority communities as equals have achieved prosperity, development and a loyalty of the minority community towards their state. Italy, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany are good examples in that sense. But when instead of yearning for peaceful coexistence the majority in some member states tries to oppress the minorities, it can lead to conflicts. These situations have to be avoided, and who else could help with this, if not the EU?”

 

What “role” have minorities communities in modern Europe and world? Are they only a “bridges” between majority population in  domicile countries or governments and countries of  origin of these minorities, as the politicians likes to say in public speech, or are they much more, like “normal” citizens of some country with all rights and obligations?

 

L. V. :  “Being a bridge between states is important, as it is a plus, a way that minorities can help interstate relations, but it is far from being the only thing they are good at. People belonging to minority communities are no less in any regard than the ones belonging to the majority. Are they taxpayers? Are they contributing to the well-being of the countries and the regions? Are they contributing to the cultural and linguistic diversity? Did they choose to live in a country or were they born there just like the ones from the majority? The answer is obvious to all of the above questions, and it is the reason why they should have the same rights.”

 

Author: Storyteller